Bird Watching at the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge

Varied Thrush - Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

With only five weeks left here in Washington, it looks like we won’t be able to kick off all the items on our Pacific Northwest Bucket List. There is only so much you can get done on the weekends, especially with a baby. To our credit, it was a pretty long list, and we got most of it done.

At this point, priorities on our to-do list have changed. We hired a property management company to rent out our home, had movers survey our belongings to ensure a smooth moving day, and bought a trailer to haul behind our Subaru so we can have a little bit of home with us when we arrive in Alaska.  I won’t go more than two weeks without my kitchen stuff, and with having a baby and a dog comes lots of extra gear. When did we become so conventional?

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

In an effort to savor the scenery of the South Puget Sound, we went down into the valley outside of our neighborhood to tour the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge. It’s a shame we hadn’t done it sooner.

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

The Refuge is nestled in a fertile valley where the coniferous rainforest meets South Puget Sound. From this place, when visibility allows, the snow-capped mountains of the Olympic National Park jut into the sky across the water, and the Tacoma Narrows Bridge spans the aquatic horizon to the north.

Rain or shine, birds skim the surface of the water, while jellyfish float gently below. The salty breeze carries waterfowl, sandpipers, hawks and kingfishers over the delta where bird watchers and their telescopes collect like barnacles.

Belted Kingfisher - Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

At this particular refuge, a boardwalk two miles long, takes tourists out over the water to get a better view of the birds that frequent the shallow waters.

European Starlings, Canadian Geese, Blue Herons, and Great Egrets freckled the delta, while Sharp-shinned Hawks soared above. Bunnies hopped across walking paths, then disappeared under the ferns while Morning Doves feasted nearby on Wild Blackberries.

It was lovely to see them all independent of one another and not actively demonstrating their roles in the food chain.

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

European Starling - Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

After we leave the Olympia area, it may be a while before we experience the salty maritime breeze.

I am, however, confident there will be no lack of wildlife to enjoy in land-locked Fairbanks.

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Canadian Geese - Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

Nisqually Wildlife Refuge | Yea Yea Pueblo

11 Comment

  1. Holly Holstead says: Reply

    Absolutely Beautiful

    1. Too bad you’re leaving that lovely area…….I would have loved to pay you a visit…..your pics and words are wonderful !

      Oma

    2. Thanks, Holly!

  2. Holly Holstead says: Reply

    Absolutely Beautiful

    1. Thanks, Holly!

  3. Beautiful pictures! 🙂

  4. Beautiful pictures! 🙂

  5. Goodness, one simple (beautiful) picture of blackberries, and I am instantly overwhelmed with homesickness! Such beautiful pictures. When I lived in WA, our property was only about 2 miles from the reserve. We used to ride our bikes down to the edge. Thanks for the “walk” down memory lane!

    1. Sure thing, Courtney. Glad you made it to Okinawa safely!

      I tried to comment on your blog but the new format is hiding the comment option from me. Avery is such a doll! As far as the sleep regression goes, it’s normal at this stage. I don’t know why, but things are supposed to get back to normal soon. Margot is touch and go with that, too. I’ll be able to empathize with you soon with the on-post housing situation. We’ll be doing the same up in AK. First time for us, so our fingers are crossed that it’s not a draconian experience. Hope your stuff arrives soon 🙂

  6. Goodness, one simple (beautiful) picture of blackberries, and I am instantly overwhelmed with homesickness! Such beautiful pictures. When I lived in WA, our property was only about 2 miles from the reserve. We used to ride our bikes down to the edge. Thanks for the “walk” down memory lane!

    1. Sure thing, Courtney. Glad you made it to Okinawa safely!

      I tried to comment on your blog but the new format is hiding the comment option from me. Avery is such a doll! As far as the sleep regression goes, it’s normal at this stage. I don’t know why, but things are supposed to get back to normal soon. Margot is touch and go with that, too. I’ll be able to empathize with you soon with the on-post housing situation. We’ll be doing the same up in AK. First time for us, so our fingers are crossed that it’s not a draconian experience. Hope your stuff arrives soon 🙂

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